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The World Needs Lights

Wednesday, June 03, 2020

The World Needs Lights

By Mark McCrary
 
Viruses.  Racism.  Injustice.  Riots. Financial upheaval.
 
It is tempting to think that things have never been worse, yet our field of vision over the course of time is very narrow.  The reality is human existence has always been filled with all of the above, along with earthquakes, tsunamis, tornados, famines, awful diseases, conquests, pillagings, dominations, food and water shortages, mosquitoes, snakes, lions and tigers, and bears… and the lists go on and on.
 
Reasons to be upset, scared, anxious, concerned, frustrated and the like are nothing new.  They have been the constant companions of the human experience and while we travel this earth, they always will.
 
Despite these realities, the Bible holds several enticing possibilities before us: we can have hope (Psalm 42:11; 62:5-6; Romans 15:13; 1 Timothy 4:10), joy (Psalm 16:11; John 15:10-12; Galatians 5:22-23 ) and peace with others (Psalm 34:13-15; Isaiah 32:16-17; Luke 2:13-14; Romans 12:17-18; 1 Corinthians 13:11)—even in this life.  It does not give us these things by taking us out of the world, but by giving us tools to use while in this world. What are these tools?
 
There are numerous passages we could look to, but let’s spend a few minutes contemplating Paul’s exhortation to the Philippians: “Do all things without grumbling or disputing, that you may be blameless and innocent, children of God without blemish in the midst of a crooked and twisted generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world, holding fast to the word of life…” (Philippians 2:14-16). 
 
Under inspiration, Paul gives us some simple, doable actions we can put into place in our lives.  First, he tells us not to complain.  All of us complain from time to time.  Sometimes, those complaints move from “time to time” to all the time.  Spend some time this week paying attention to your speech; look over your social media posts.  Be honest. How much do you see yourself complaining? It may be more than you think.  We can post all the Bible verses we like on Facebook or Instagram, but when we complain—especially when people know we are a Christian—we aren’t showing the world that we are any different than anyone else.  So, check your complaining. Complaints stem from too close a proximity to the world.  Paul’s attitude (and Christ’s for that matter) was radical because he focused on different things: “So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal” ( 2 Corinthians 4:16-18).
 
When you make the decision to stop being negative, you must follow that up with an equal decision to being positive— shine as a light.  Point people from the chaos of the world to the love and peace of God.  You aren’t being self-righteous when you decide to model this; people need to see that it really is possible to have the peace that “surpasses all understanding” (Philippians 4:7) in the “midst of a crooked and twisted generation.” People need to hear that injustices are real, that life stinks sometimes, but when one sets their mind on God in obedience, it really can change one’s life and outlook.  We need to be living proof of this.
 
Finally, all of this is made possible because you “hold fast to God’s word.” Every day we are all tempted to cast aside the Biblical teachings to some degree or another. Don’t.  Always remember that real freedom comes from following God and His word (Romans 6:15-19). The more we submit to God’s wisdom rather than our own, the more peace we will have.  Hold on desperately to God and His word.  
 
God needs a hitter this week in this game we call life.  Let’s step up to the plate.

Reflections on the New Star Wars Movies and a Disturbing Cultural Message

Monday, April 27, 2020

Reflections on the New Star Wars Movies and a Disturbing Cultural Message

By Mark McCrary
 
I’ve been thinking about the new Star Wars movies.  No, this isn’t a review, a geeky complaint or admonition to watch them.  It is a consideration of what they are saying about us as a culture.  There’s a spiritual point, so please stick with me for a few minutes.
 
I remember walking out of the second new movie (“The Last Jedi”) wondering, “Okay… so, who’s the bad guy here?” The one I thought was the bad guy, Snoke, had been killed in the middle of the movie. I didn’t think it was Kylo Ren because while he was sometimes bad, he kinda acted like he wanted to be good sometimes.  So, who’s the bad guy?
 
Why’s it so important to have a bad guy? Because the original Star Wars movies were a morality play. They were good versus evil. In the first Star Wars movie, within the first 5 minutes we were introduced to Darth Vader.  He was dark, imposing, barking orders with his deep bass, slightly mechanized voice, lifting people up in the air choking them with the power of the Force… and that was the just the beginning of the movie.  Hands down, there were no questions as to who the bad guy was in this movie (and the subsequent original movies). But, there was no one like that in the new movies.  
 
I think—on reflection—that the possible reason why could be of significance to Christians.  You see, the original and new movies were made in two very different times in our nation’s culture.  In the 70’s (with all its problems), there was still an acceptance of some absolutes; in good and evil; black and white.  However, today, absolutes are by and large rejected.  Views about right and wrong are more “nuanced.” Rather than black and white, things are more gray and uncertain.
 
It is true that there is a lot of gray in life. But absolutes, black and white, right and wrong… these are things that can’t be ignored.  If they are, it is to our peril.  This isn’t just reality; it is biblical.  
 
God is good (Exodus 34:6; 1 Chronicles 16:34; Psalm 145:9). Not just sometimes, but always.  He is perfect, and all his guidances are right (Psalm 19:7-11). Jesus is the absolute perfect physical reflection of this perfect God (John 1:1,14; Hebrews 1:3), and He is the only way to Him (John 14:6).
 
The Devil is evil (Matthew 13:19)—not misunderstood; not confused.  He is a liar and a murderer (John 8:44), and to follow Him leads to certain, eternal punishment (Matthew 25:41-46).
 
There is light and darkness (1 John 1:5-10), and you and I have to choose which one we will walk in.  If we choose the light, we will go to heaven.  If we choose darkness, we will be lost in hell forever.
 
Now, I acknowledge I may be making too much out of this.  But, importantly, as our culture drifts more into a rejection of absolutes it will be reflected more and more in our entertainment.  Followers of God must not have our heads in the sand about this. While I am not suggesting we must abstain from entertainment because of these messages (though some may choose to), I am saying in no uncertain terms that we must be aware of them; and more importantly, aware of the biblical message and its truthfulness. We must stand by that message. Otherwise, we will be spiritually confused and liable to fall for any deception that comes our way (Ephesians 4:14).

Who Can Be Against Us?

Thursday, July 02, 2015

Who Can Be Against Us?

By Mark McCrary

It seems that a lot of Christians are down and out right now, discouraged by recent events in our country.  Let’s find a few words of encouragement from God’s word—Romans 8:31-39…

“What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things? Who shall bring a charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is he who condemns? It is Christ who died, and furthermore is also risen, who is even at the right hand of God, who also makes intercession for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written: ‘For Your sake we are killed all day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.”

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers, nor things present nor things to come, nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Christian, have hope!  Trust in God in difficult days!

 
 

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