Growing In Godliness Blog

Growing In Godliness Blog

Author: Mark McCrary

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Women and the New Testament

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Women and the New Testament
By Mark McCrary

Mention the Bible to some people today, and one of the first things they will think of is sexism. After all, it teaches that men are the head of the house, that women can’t be preachers, that they are second class citizens, that sex is only for the man—generally, that women aren’t important, right?

Well, yes and no. It is certainly true that God has ordained that the man is to be the head of the family (Eph. 5:22-29), and He has also determined that women are not to have teaching authority over men (1 Timothy 2:11-12). No Sexual Revolution can ever overthrow these truths. However, most misconceptions and misunderstandings people have about women and the Bible are just that—misconceptions and misunderstandings; and very erroneous ones as at that.

Did you know that women ministered to Jesus and helped Him in his important task? Luke 8:3 tells of many who “provided for Him from their substance.” Women were also the first witnesses of the resurrection (Luke 24:1-10). This is remarkable because in Jewish society, the testimony of women in the court of law had little if any weight.

One of the few named servants in the church apart from the apostles was that of a woman—Phoebe (Romans 16:1). In fact, Romans 16 list the names of a number of disciples in the city of Roman, many of which were women, such as Priscilla (v. 3), Mary (v. 6), Juna (v. 7), Tryphena, Tryphosa, Persis (v. 12) and Julia (v. 15). Mentioned as well—though not by name—are Rufus’ mother (v. 13) and Nereus’ sister (v. 15).

Contrary to the view of women in much of the first century society, the teachings of the New Testament lifted them up. Their sexual desires and needs were elevated to the same level as those of men—“Let the husband render to his wife the affection due her, and likewise also the wife to her husband. The wife does not have authority over her own body, but the husband does. And likewise the husband does not have authority over his own body, but the wife does.” Peter reminded husbands that they are to view their wives as “heirs together of the grace of life” (1 Pet. 3:7). To fail to do so, he warned, would hinder a man’s prayers to God. Also, the husband was told to view his wife as a “weaker vessel”—not that she is spiritually weaker, but she was to be viewed as something precious and valuable to him; something to be honored and protected at all costs.

Though the husband is the spiritual leader in the home, there is certainly a sense from Ephesians 5 that even he is submissive to his wife as he leads. Everything he does in verses 25-29 is with her and her well being in view. If she is not bettered because of his leadership, he’s doing something wrong and needs to correct it.

That they are also of the same spiritual value as men is seen in Gal. 3:26-29, “For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.”

Are women under more restrictions then men? From a teaching standpoint, yes; but from the standpoint of worth and usefulness, she stands shoulder to shoulder and head to head with any man. Her role is not one of leadership. But remember: role is functional; worth is intrinsic. Let’s focus on the worth and value of women found in the New Testament; let’s preach it, embrace it, use it and live it.

God has blessed me with three wonderful and spiritually minded daughters. My prayer for them and all God’s female servants is that they be used—just as any man—in God’s kingdom as He sees fit for His own glory and honor. Such should be the prayer of us all.

Proclaiming the Lord’s Death

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Proclaiming the Lord’s Death
 
By Mark McCrary
 
What is the single most important event in human history? The discovery of fire? Creation of the wheel? The internet? Facebook? Texting? Twittering?
 
For the child of God, what should be the most important event is the death of Jesus Christ for our sins. That moment where He gave Himself so that we might have salvation.
 
The apostle Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 11:26, “For as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes.” Christians gather on the first day of the week to remember what Jesus did. Paul said we proclaim what He did.
 
In many ways, it is a sad proclamation. In Romans 5:6, Paul also wrote, “For when we were still without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.” Jesus gave His life because you and I chose to sin. Jesus’ blood was shed because we were selfish and willful. He paid the price so we do not have to. If we were to be right with God, there was no other way. That ought to cause profound sorrow in our hearts.
 
But, it is an equally joyous proclamation. Christ willingly—and, the Hebrew writer adds, gladly (Hebrews 12:1-3)—gave Himself for us. God so loved the world that He gave His Son. And, Jesus so loved the Father and us that He went. Because of what Jesus did we may have salvation, though we are not worthy. Thanks be to God!
 
That’s why the Lord's Supper on the first day of the week is so important. It is a time when we remember, we give thanks and we proclaim. We do this every Lord’s Day (Acts 20:7) because it is a shared meal with Christians, and we desire to gather each Lord's Day to worship God and encourage one another. We do it each Lord's Day because we must always must remind ourselves of this foundational truth: while we were enemies, Christ died for us.
 
So, this week, when you take the Lord’s Supper, proclaim! Proclaim your sorrow that you caused His death. Proclaim your joy that His death brings your salvation. Proclaim it to your brothers and sisters. And through the week, let’s proclaim it to the world through godly behavior and reverential honor for God.

What Makes Christianity Unique?

Monday, February 29, 2016

What Makes Christianity Unique?

By Mark McCrary

Of all the world’s religions, what makes Christianity unique? Why should it be considered above all others?

Like most religions that revolve around a concept of a singular God, Christianity emphasizes the holiness of God. But Christianity’s take is somewhat different than many others; it is not simply that He is a good God, but His holiness means He is a perfect God - there is no sin in Him. Because He is holy, if we are to have a relationship with Him, we must be holy as well (“…but as He who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, because it is written, ‘Be holy, for I am holy’”). God is so perfect, in fact, He cannot tolerate the presence of sin. Isaiah 59:2 tells us, “But your iniquities have separated you from your God; and your sins have hidden His face from you, so that He will not hear.”

Such holiness demands that God be just. Unlike the teachings of some religions, He can’t look at our lives and, if there is more good than bad, wave away that bad as if it didn’t happen. It did; and His holiness can’t ignore it. There must be a price paid for those wrongs (“And according to the law almost all things are purified with blood, and without shedding of blood there is no remission,” Hebrews 9:22).

But, Romans 3:26 tells us something beautiful: because God is holy, He must be just; to be less than just would make Him less than holy. But—importantly— He is also the justifier (Rom. 3:26, “…To demonstrate at the present time His righteousness, that He might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus”). What makes Christianity unique, ultimately, is Jesus Christ—God coming down in the form of man to pay the price for our sins (Hebrews 9:22) and reconcile us to the Holy God.

“For when we were still without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die; yet perhaps for a good man someone would even dare to die. But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from wrath through Him. For if when we were enemies we were reconciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been reconciled, we shall be saved by His life. And not only that, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation,” Rom. 5:6-11.

Christianity presents a God who is so holy He cannot tolerate sin. Yet, for some reason He paid the price for our sins through His Son Jesus Christ. Why would He do such a thing? Because “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

That’s what makes Christianity unique.

The Power of Two

Friday, February 12, 2016

The Power of Two

By Mark McCrary

“If you want something done right, you’ve got to do it yourself!”  How many times have we heard that? How many times have we said that? Have you ever looked at Luke 10 and wondered why Jesus sent His disciples “two by two?”

One of the things that made the life of Paul so wonderful is the fact he never starred in “The Adventures of Paul the Apostle.”  Like the great servants of God who had gone before him—Moses and Joshua, Ruth and Naomi, Elijah and Elisha—he did his work with others.  He lived the wisdom of King Solomon, “Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their labor.  For if they fall, one will lift up his companion. But woe to him who is alone when he falls, For he has no one to help him up. Again, if two lie down together, they will keep warm; But how can one be warm alone? Though one may be overpowered by another, two can withstand him.  And a threefold cord is not quickly broken” (Ecclesiastes 4:9-12).  He lived “The Power of Two.”

The “Power of Two” in Paul’s life really began with Barnabas in Acts 11, as the church in Jerusalem sent him to Antioch after the “wall of separation” had fallen between Jews and Gentiles.  We are told in Acts 11:23 that great things were taking place there.  Yet, verse 25 tells us this effective teacher felt, on some level, the need for help and left this blossoming work to find a certain disciple he had defended before the church in Jerusalem less than 10 years before.

Saul joined the side of his old defender, and one of the greatest “teams” in history was formed.  Chapters 13-15, spanning a period of some 11 years, show remarkably the “Power of Two.”  They traveled together.  They preached together.  They disputed error together.  Together, they left churches in better shape.

What are the lessons preachers and teachers can learn from Paul and Barnabas? First, there is benefit of diversity.  Paul, as evidenced in Acts 14:12 and other verses (Acts 13:7, 43, 46; 14:1), seemed to have been the more active orator.  While preaching in Lystra, he was believed to be Hermes, messenger of the Greek gods.  Barnabas, on the other hand, was thought to be Zeus.  F.F. Bruce suggests in his commentary on Acts that he was thus identified because of “his more dignified bearing.”  This is, of course, conjecture, but it does illustrate the reality that they were two different men contributing something needed to the same work.  Diversity in abilities is sometimes one of the great powers of two.  One may have a strength needed in one area of work at a particular moment, while someone else brings strength in other areas and at other times. 

There is also the benefit of shared encouragement.  How often did Barnabas get tired, yet Paul’s zeal fueled him on? How often did Paul get frustrated, yet Barnabas’ steady temperament settled him down?  This is one of our great needs as Christians today—someone to lift us up when we are down; to urge us forward in our task when all we want to do is quit.

Then there is the benefit of shared wisdom.  The Bible speaks often of the need of good counselors (Proverbs 11:14; 15:22; 24:6).  Paul likely relied upon the “seasoned” advice of Barnabas from time to time.  Perhaps at other times Paul’s take on a situation was more accurate and Barnabas benefited.  Preachers and teachers would do well to have someone close by for practical wisdom and guidance.

Finally, there is the benefit of a shared harvest.  Barnabas left the fields “white for harvest” to make a trip of 300 miles for one reason:  he knew two could do more than one. Why is it never recorded that Barnabas became angry over Paul’s more vocal position?  When he was considered a “lesser” god than Barnabas, why didn’t Paul get angry?  Because they were selfless men, and the harvest was all that mattered.  Workers look to the potential of a larger harvest with which to glorify God.  What keeps some from never “teaming” with others and discovering the power of shared work is pride and rivalry.  How should you feel when another preacher or teacher is thanked for a point well made? Rejoice that the gospel is preached (1 Corinthians 3:5-6; Romans 12:15)!  The harvest is our goal, not our place in the harvesting. 

What, then, do we learn from Paul and Barnabas?  Learn the power of two!  Some preachers may preach with another preacher at the same church.  Others may find the “Power of Two” in another preacher close by.  Some men or women may “team teach” a class.  Open your heart to the help of others—and be willing to give it as well.

What does it Mean to be a Christian?

Thursday, October 22, 2015

What does it Mean to be a Christian?

By Mark McCrary

May I ask you to think about a question—do you consider yourself to be a Christian? May I ask you to consider a follow up question- what does it even mean to be a Christian? To a lot of people, being a Christian is just the idea of going to worship services a few times a month (or year), praying from time to time, or having a generally good idea and feeling about God and believing in Him.  But, that’s not the standard that Jesus set.

Jesus said this in Matthew 7:21-23, “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!”

Perhaps the defining trait for the child of God is obeying God and submitting to Him and His will for our lives.  It is looking to Him and His word, and taking that study seriously and contemplating when you study, “Am I living this way? Is God first in my life? Am I obeying Him?”

What many do is profess to have faith, but then do whatever they want to do.  Jesus said if we want to be a part of the kingdom of heaven, we are concerned about what God tells us to do, and we do just that.

Are you living as A Christian?

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