Growing In Godliness Blog

Growing In Godliness Blog

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Forgive and Be Forgiven

Friday, May 13, 2016

Forgive and Be Forgiven

By Mike Cox

When someone has said or done something to hurt you, are you quick to forgive? Does forgiveness ever occur or is revenge the preference? “Someone did wrong to me and I want to see them suffer.”  A synonym for someone “wronging” us is the word trespass. Maybe someone is in debt to us but there is no end in sight for the debt to be paid. Matthew 18:21-35 describes two servants. One servant begs their master for forgiveness of his debt and the master has compassion on him and forgives the debt. However, this servant turns around and doesn’t have compassion on his servant. When the master of the first servant heard what had been done, he was angered and delivered his servant to the torturers (v. 34).

There are things that link all humans together - make us similar. The one thing that links everyone is the fact that they have sinned against God (Romans 3:23). While the debtors mentioned had a financial debt, all humans have a figurative debt to God for the sins they’ve committed. This is when everyone needs the compassion of God to wipe our debts clean. When we are baptized, our debt is wiped clean - our sins are forgiven.  If someone has done wrong towards us we are to forgive them; we are to show mercy. If we don’t, how can we expect to be forgiven our debt? Verse 35 says, “So, My Heavenly Father also will do to you if each of you from his heart does not forgive his brother his trespasses”. Matthew 18:21-22 tells us that we should forgive someone up to “seventy times seven”. The point of this isn’t a quantified number of times to forgive someone, but to constantly forgive.

Everyone needs to forgive and everyone has need to be forgiven. Jesus died on the cross to wipe our sins away. Even so, after we come to the Lord we are to ask forgiveness of our sins. If we ask and strive to do God’s will, we will be forgiven. Nonetheless if we refuse to forgive someone, the Lord knows.

Women and the New Testament

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Women and the New Testament
By Mark McCrary

Mention the Bible to some people today, and one of the first things they will think of is sexism. After all, it teaches that men are the head of the house, that women can’t be preachers, that they are second class citizens, that sex is only for the man—generally, that women aren’t important, right?

Well, yes and no. It is certainly true that God has ordained that the man is to be the head of the family (Eph. 5:22-29), and He has also determined that women are not to have teaching authority over men (1 Timothy 2:11-12). No Sexual Revolution can ever overthrow these truths. However, most misconceptions and misunderstandings people have about women and the Bible are just that—misconceptions and misunderstandings; and very erroneous ones as at that.

Did you know that women ministered to Jesus and helped Him in his important task? Luke 8:3 tells of many who “provided for Him from their substance.” Women were also the first witnesses of the resurrection (Luke 24:1-10). This is remarkable because in Jewish society, the testimony of women in the court of law had little if any weight.

One of the few named servants in the church apart from the apostles was that of a woman—Phoebe (Romans 16:1). In fact, Romans 16 list the names of a number of disciples in the city of Roman, many of which were women, such as Priscilla (v. 3), Mary (v. 6), Juna (v. 7), Tryphena, Tryphosa, Persis (v. 12) and Julia (v. 15). Mentioned as well—though not by name—are Rufus’ mother (v. 13) and Nereus’ sister (v. 15).

Contrary to the view of women in much of the first century society, the teachings of the New Testament lifted them up. Their sexual desires and needs were elevated to the same level as those of men—“Let the husband render to his wife the affection due her, and likewise also the wife to her husband. The wife does not have authority over her own body, but the husband does. And likewise the husband does not have authority over his own body, but the wife does.” Peter reminded husbands that they are to view their wives as “heirs together of the grace of life” (1 Pet. 3:7). To fail to do so, he warned, would hinder a man’s prayers to God. Also, the husband was told to view his wife as a “weaker vessel”—not that she is spiritually weaker, but she was to be viewed as something precious and valuable to him; something to be honored and protected at all costs.

Though the husband is the spiritual leader in the home, there is certainly a sense from Ephesians 5 that even he is submissive to his wife as he leads. Everything he does in verses 25-29 is with her and her well being in view. If she is not bettered because of his leadership, he’s doing something wrong and needs to correct it.

That they are also of the same spiritual value as men is seen in Gal. 3:26-29, “For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.”

Are women under more restrictions then men? From a teaching standpoint, yes; but from the standpoint of worth and usefulness, she stands shoulder to shoulder and head to head with any man. Her role is not one of leadership. But remember: role is functional; worth is intrinsic. Let’s focus on the worth and value of women found in the New Testament; let’s preach it, embrace it, use it and live it.

God has blessed me with three wonderful and spiritually minded daughters. My prayer for them and all God’s female servants is that they be used—just as any man—in God’s kingdom as He sees fit for His own glory and honor. Such should be the prayer of us all.

The Blessing of God's Word

Tuesday, April 05, 2016

The Blessing of God's Word

By Wyatt Taylor

We live in a remarkable age.  Thanks to the blessings of modern technology, we have nearly instant access to all kinds of information – from breaking world news to the most insignificant sports statistic.  I rely on this so much that it is hard to recall a time when this kind of access wasn’t a part of my life, but really, it has only come about in the last 10-15 years.  How did anyone live in a world before Google?

Jesus’ words in Matthew 13:16-17 remind us that we are blessed in another, more important way.  There was a time, after all, when humans did not have access to the kind of spiritual information we have at our disposal in the pages of scripture today.  Jesus says, “But blessed are your eyes for they see, and your ears for they hear; for assuredly, I say to you that many prophets and righteous men desired to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.”  Christ’s disciples, of course, saw the Son of God and heard Him teaching of the fulfillment of the Law in Him.  Jesus reminds them that the prophets and righteous men that came before, many of whom we read about in the Old Testament today, were working with limited information.  In their day, God’s plan had not yet been fully revealed.  Many of the things they prophesied they did not understand.  As we study the Bible today, we can see the arch of God’s plan throughout history: how Christ was prophesied at the beginning, how God worked through His people to bring Him into the world to die for our sins, and how he established His Kingdom.  Christ’s words here remind us that we should not take this for granted, since God’s people have longed for such information throughout time.

Backing up a few verses to Matthew 13:10-15, Jesus is asked by the disciples why he teaches in parables.  In response, Jesus quotes a passage from the prophet Isaiah (Is. 6:9-10), “Hearing you will hear and shall not understand, and seeing you will see and not perceive; for the hearts of this people have grown dull.  Their ears are hard of hearing, and their eyes they have closed, lest they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, lest they should understand with their hearts and turn, so that I should heal them.”  One of the tragedies of the gospels is that those people who should have received Jesus most readily, the Jewish leaders of the day, were the very ones shouting “Crucify Him!”  How did they mistake the Son of God for a blasphemer?  Jesus tells us here – “the hearts of this people have grown dull.”

It would be an even greater tragedy for those today with such easy access to the word of God to neglect it and be forever lost.  May it never be said of us that our hearts have grown dull to the gospel!  Instead, let us resolve to open God’s word, search it with hearts open to the truth, and in understanding turn to Jesus Christ for the healing that only He can provide.

Proclaiming the Lord’s Death

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Proclaiming the Lord’s Death
 
By Mark McCrary
 
What is the single most important event in human history? The discovery of fire? Creation of the wheel? The internet? Facebook? Texting? Twittering?
 
For the child of God, what should be the most important event is the death of Jesus Christ for our sins. That moment where He gave Himself so that we might have salvation.
 
The apostle Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 11:26, “For as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes.” Christians gather on the first day of the week to remember what Jesus did. Paul said we proclaim what He did.
 
In many ways, it is a sad proclamation. In Romans 5:6, Paul also wrote, “For when we were still without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.” Jesus gave His life because you and I chose to sin. Jesus’ blood was shed because we were selfish and willful. He paid the price so we do not have to. If we were to be right with God, there was no other way. That ought to cause profound sorrow in our hearts.
 
But, it is an equally joyous proclamation. Christ willingly—and, the Hebrew writer adds, gladly (Hebrews 12:1-3)—gave Himself for us. God so loved the world that He gave His Son. And, Jesus so loved the Father and us that He went. Because of what Jesus did we may have salvation, though we are not worthy. Thanks be to God!
 
That’s why the Lord's Supper on the first day of the week is so important. It is a time when we remember, we give thanks and we proclaim. We do this every Lord’s Day (Acts 20:7) because it is a shared meal with Christians, and we desire to gather each Lord's Day to worship God and encourage one another. We do it each Lord's Day because we must always must remind ourselves of this foundational truth: while we were enemies, Christ died for us.
 
So, this week, when you take the Lord’s Supper, proclaim! Proclaim your sorrow that you caused His death. Proclaim your joy that His death brings your salvation. Proclaim it to your brothers and sisters. And through the week, let’s proclaim it to the world through godly behavior and reverential honor for God.

What Makes Christianity Unique?

Monday, February 29, 2016

What Makes Christianity Unique?

By Mark McCrary

Of all the world’s religions, what makes Christianity unique? Why should it be considered above all others?

Like most religions that revolve around a concept of a singular God, Christianity emphasizes the holiness of God. But Christianity’s take is somewhat different than many others; it is not simply that He is a good God, but His holiness means He is a perfect God - there is no sin in Him. Because He is holy, if we are to have a relationship with Him, we must be holy as well (“…but as He who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, because it is written, ‘Be holy, for I am holy’”). God is so perfect, in fact, He cannot tolerate the presence of sin. Isaiah 59:2 tells us, “But your iniquities have separated you from your God; and your sins have hidden His face from you, so that He will not hear.”

Such holiness demands that God be just. Unlike the teachings of some religions, He can’t look at our lives and, if there is more good than bad, wave away that bad as if it didn’t happen. It did; and His holiness can’t ignore it. There must be a price paid for those wrongs (“And according to the law almost all things are purified with blood, and without shedding of blood there is no remission,” Hebrews 9:22).

But, Romans 3:26 tells us something beautiful: because God is holy, He must be just; to be less than just would make Him less than holy. But—importantly— He is also the justifier (Rom. 3:26, “…To demonstrate at the present time His righteousness, that He might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus”). What makes Christianity unique, ultimately, is Jesus Christ—God coming down in the form of man to pay the price for our sins (Hebrews 9:22) and reconcile us to the Holy God.

“For when we were still without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die; yet perhaps for a good man someone would even dare to die. But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from wrath through Him. For if when we were enemies we were reconciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been reconciled, we shall be saved by His life. And not only that, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation,” Rom. 5:6-11.

Christianity presents a God who is so holy He cannot tolerate sin. Yet, for some reason He paid the price for our sins through His Son Jesus Christ. Why would He do such a thing? Because “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

That’s what makes Christianity unique.

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